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Got Drugs?

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The question of what to do with leftover medications is a good one. As a healthcare provider, I need to know the answer for my patients, and wanted to pass the information I found on the FDA’s website along to my readers.

  • Medicine Take-Back Programs On April 27, 2013, there will be a National Prescription Drug Take-Back Event. Follow this link for your state information:  http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/
  • Disposal in Household Trash If no Take-Back Program is available, follow these steps to get rid of your unwanted meds:
  1. Mix medicines (do NOT crush tablets or capsules) with an unpalatable substance such as kitty litter or used coffee grounds;
  2. Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag; and
  3. Throw the container in your household trash.
  4. Before throwing out a medicine container, such as a pill bottle, remember to scratch out all information on the prescription label to make it unreadable.
  • Flushing of Certain Medications Some medicines could be so harmful to others if taken that the best thing is to flush them down the toilet. These medications are:
Medicine
Active Ingredient
Abstral (PDF – 1M)tablets (sublingual) Fentanyl
Actiq (PDF – 251KB), oral transmucosal lozenge * Fentanyl Citrate
Avinza (PDF – 51KB), capsules (extended release) Morphine Sulfate
Daytrana (PDF – 281KB), transdermal patch system Methylphenidate
Demerol, tablets * Meperidine Hydrochloride
Demerol, oral solution * Meperidine Hydrochloride
Diastat/Diastat AcuDial, rectal gel [for disposal
instructions: click on link, then go to “Label information”
and view current label]
Diazepam
Dilaudid, tablets * Hydromorphone Hydrochloride
Dilaudid, oral liquid * Hydromorphone Hydrochloride
Dolophine Hydrochloride (PDF – 48KB), tablets * Methadone Hydrochloride
Duragesic (PDF – 179KB), patch (extended release) * Fentanyl
Embeda (PDF – 39KB), capsules (extended release) Morphine Sulfate; Naltrexone Hydrochloride
Exalgo (PDF – 83KB), tablets (extended release) Hydromorphone Hydrochloride
Fentora (PDF – 338KB), tablets (buccal) Fentanyl Citrate
Kadian (PDF – 135KB), capsules (extended release) Morphine Sulfate
Methadone Hydrochloride, oral solution * Methadone Hydrochloride
Methadose, tablets * Methadone Hydrochloride
Morphine Sulfate, tablets (immediate release) * Morphine Sulfate
Morphine Sulfate (PDF – 282KB), oral solution * Morphine Sulfate
MS Contin (PDF – 433KB), tablets (extended release) * Morphine Sulfate
Nucynta ER (PDF – 38KB), tablets (extended release) Tapentadol
Onsolis (PDF – 297KB), soluble film (buccal) Fentanyl Citrate
Opana, tablets (immediate release) Oxymorphone Hydrochloride
Opana ER (PDF – 56KB), tablets (extended release) Oxymorphone Hydrochloride
Oxecta, tablets (immediate release) Oxycodone Hydrochloride
Oxycodone Hydrochloride, capsules Oxycodone Hydrochloride
Oxycodone Hydrochloride (PDF – 100KB), oral solution Oxycodone Hydrochloride
Oxycontin (PDF – 417KB), tablets (extended release) * Oxycodone Hydrochloride
Percocet, tablets * Acetaminophen; Oxycodone Hydrochloride
Percodan, tablets * Aspirin; Oxycodone Hydrochloride
Xyrem (PDF – 185KB), oral solution Sodium Oxybate

This information was taken from the Federal Drug Administration’s website. http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/BuyingUsingMedicineSafely/EnsuringSafeUseofMedicine/SafeDisposalofMedicines/ucm186187.htm#Flushing_list

For anyone concerned about about the impact on the environment, the FDA makes this statement:

“We are aware of recent reports that have noted trace amounts of medicines in the water system. The majority of medicines found in the water system are a result of the body’s natural routes of drug elimination (in urine or feces). Scientists, to date, have found no evidence of harmful effects to human health from medicines in the environment.

Disposal of these select, few medicines by flushing contributes only a small fraction of the total amount of medicine found in the water. When a medicine take-back program isn’t available, FDA believes that any potential risk to people and the environment from flushing this small, select list of medicines is outweighed by the real possibility of life-threatening risks from accidental ingestion of these medicines.”

Remember to never share your prescription meds with another person.

Now, have a good day and annoy others with your newfound knowledge!

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About gingerbrdl

Mom, knitter, runner, avid reader, movie addict

Posted on February 28, 2013, in Health and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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